Service Level Agreement Inhalt

The main point is to create a new layer on the network, cloud or SOA middleware, capable of creating a negotiation mechanism between service providers and consumers. For example, the EU-funded Framework 7 research project SLA@SOI[12], which investigates aspects of multi-tier, multi-vendor SLAs within service-oriented infrastructure and cloud computing, while another EU-funded project, VISION Cloud,[13] has delivered results for content-oriented ASAs. The escalation procedure regulates the procedure in case of non-achievement of the agreed objectives (Bundi & Trachsel, 2010, p. 8). The consequences and effects of non-compliance with the entire contract or certain elements are therefore significant. These should be regulated in particular at the financial level. Any claims and their calculations should be used (Schmidt, 2007, p. 74). The exit point in the event of non-performance must be fixed in order to avoid arbitrary exit from contracts in the event of under-performance. A service level agreement typically contains the following information (actual content may vary depending on the type of service): As dedicated hardware applications are moved to the cloud, they must achieve the same or even more demanding service levels than traditional installations. SLAs for cloud services focus on data center characteristics and more recently include network features (see carrier cloud) to support end-to-end SLAs. [11] A service level agreement (SLA) is an obligation between a service provider and a customer.

Particular aspects of the service – quality, availability, responsibilities – are agreed between the service provider and the service user. [1] The most common component of an SLA is that services must be provided to the customer as contractually agreed. For example, Internet service providers and telecommunications companies will typically include service level agreements in the terms of their contracts with customers to define the service level(s) sold in plain language. In this case, the SLA usually deconstructs a technical definition in the intermediate period between failures (MTBF), average repair time or mean recovery time (MTTR); identification of the party responsible for reporting errors or paying fees; responsibility for different data rates; throughput; Jitter; or similar measurable details. Since the late 1980s, SLAs have been used by fixed telecommunications operators. Today, SLAs are so prevalent that large organizations have many different SLAs in the company itself. Two different units in an organization write an SLA, one being the customer and the other the service provider. This approach helps maintain the same quality of service across different units of the organization and across multiple locations in the organization. This internal SLA scripting also makes it possible to compare the quality of service between an internal department and an external service provider.

[4] A service level agreement (SLA) is a contract between a service provider and its customers, which documents the services that the provider will provide and defines the service standards that the provider is required to meet. . . .